The Latest: Largest Tennessee County chooses mayor

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NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) - The Latest on Tennessee's primary election (all times local):

10:03 p.m.

Democrat Lee Harris has defeated Republican David Lenoir in the race for mayor of Tennessee's largest county.

Harris defeated Lenoir in the contest for the mayor of Shelby County, which includes Memphis and its suburbs and has a popluation of about 930,000. Harris replaces two-term Mayor Mark Luttrell.

Harris is a University of Memphis law professor and a former Memphis City Council member. He served as the Senate minority leader in the General Assembly and has been outspoken on several issues, including his support of the removal of three statues of Confederate leaders from public parks in Memphis.

Lenoir played football at the University of Alabama and then worked in the financial services industry before he was elected to serve as the county trustee - also known as the county's banker - in 2010.

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9:54 p.m.

Incumbent Steve Cohen has won the Democratic primary in Tennessee's 9th Congressional District.

Cohen is seeking his seventh term representing the city of Memphis in the House.

He will face Republican Charlotte Bergmann, who ran unopposed in the GOP primary.

A vocal opponent of President Donald Trump, Cohen's hold on the solidly Democratic district seems safe. He has defeated Bergmann twice before, winning by wide margins on both occasions.

Election Day is Nov. 6.

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9:50 p.m.

Film producer Justin Kanew will take on Republican Mark Green in the contest to replace Marsha Blackburn in Tennessee's 7th Congressional District.

Kanew won the Democratic primary over Special Forces Green Beret Matt Reel. Kanew will face Green, who ran unopposed in his party's primary.

Blackburn stepped away from her House seat to run for the U.S. Senate.

Kanew produced several films, including "Welcome to the Jungle" in 2013.

Green ran unopposed in the Republican primary. A former Army soldier and flight surgeon who grew up in a small town in Mississippi, he raised more than $1.6 million. He withdrew as President Donald Trump's nominee for Army secretary in 2017 amid criticism of his comments about Muslims, and gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender Americans.

Green called the attacks "false and misleading."

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9:40 p.m.

Dawn Barlow will represent Democrats in the race to replace Diane Black in Tennessee's 6th Congressional District.

Barlow, a doctor from Rickman, is running to fill the open seat left by Black, a Republican who ran for Tennessee governor. Barlow will face Republican John Rose in the Nov. 6 general election.

Barlow defeated a field that included United Methodist minister Merrilee Wineinger of Hendersonville.

The large district in north Tennessee includes 17 counties and parts of two more.

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9:38 p.m.

Mariah Phillips has won the Democratic primary in Tennessee's 4th Congressional District.

Phillips defeated two other Democrats in the primary in the district that includes the Nashville suburb of Smyrna, the city of Murfreesboro and several southeast Tennessee counties.

Phillips, of Murfreesboro, has worked at Starbucks and as a teacher at an alternative school in Rutherford County. She led her opponents in fundraising by a wide margin.

Phillips faces four-term Republican incumbent Scott DesJarlais in the Nov. 6 general election. She has already begun targeting DesJarlais in press communications.

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9:35 p.m.

Farmer and businessman John Rose has won the Republican primary in Tennessee's 6th Congressional district.

Rose, of Cookeville, will attempt to replace fellow Republican Diane Black, who ran for Tennessee governor. He will face Democrat Dawn Barlow on Nov. 6.

Retired judge Bob Corlew and Rose had aggressively targeted each other in negative media advertisements. They each portrayed themselves as close allies of President Donald Trump.

Both had contributed large amounts of money to their own campaigns.

Rose grew up in Cookeville and runs his family's farm in DeKalb County.

The district in northern Tennessee includes 17 counties and parts of two more.

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9:25 p.m.

A former Tennessee lawmaker known for being skewered on late-night comedy shows has failed in his bid to return to the state Legislature.

Stacey Campfield finished third in a GOP primary for House District 89 in the Knoxville area, one of 86 contested state legislative races in Tennessee on Thursday. Justin Lafferty, a small business owner and stay-at-home dad, won the nomination to replace state Rep. Roger Kane, who chose not to seek re-election.

During his time in office, Campfield was a magnet for controversy. He once likened the insurance requirement under President Barack Obama's health care law to the forced deportation of Jews during the Holocaust. In 2005 he tried to join the legislative black caucus. When he was refused, he said the Ku Klux Klan was more inclusive.

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9:14 p.m.

Knox County Mayor Tim Burchett has won the Republican primary in Tennessee's 2nd Congressional District.

Burchett defeated six other Republicans as he seeks to fill the open seat in the traditionally GOP district in East Tennessee. Rep. John Duncan Jr., who has held the seat since 1988, is retiring from Congress.

Other notable candidates in the GOP primary included state Rep. Jimmy Matlock of Lenoir City, military aviator Ashley Nickloes of Rockford and businessman Jason Emert of Louisville.

Matlock and Burchett leveled negative attacks at each other in the run-up to the primary.

Burchett faces Renee Hoyos in the general election on Nov. 6.

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8:42 p.m.

Renee Hoyos is the winner of the Democratic primary in Tennessee's 2nd Congressional District.

Hoyos defeated two other Democrats in the race to fill the open seat in the traditionally GOP district in East Tennessee. Rep. John Duncan Jr., who has held the seat since 1988, is retiring from Congress.

Hoyos, of Knoxville, served as the executive director of the Tennessee Clean Water Network. The group works to improve water quality across the state.

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8:20 p.m.

Incumbent Scott DesJarlais has won the Republican primary in Tennessee's 4th Congressional District.

DesJarlais is seeking his fifth term in Congress in the district that includes the Nashville suburb of Smyrna, the city of Murfreesboro and several southeast Tennessee counties.

A physician who now opposes abortion rights, he has faced a series of personal scandals that included affairs with patients, urging a mistress to seek an abortion and once holding a gun in his mouth for hours outside his ex-wife's room.

DesJarlais is among 11 members of the House who have filed articles of impeachment against Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein. Rosenstein oversees Robert Mueller, who is investigating Russia's involvement in the 2016 presidential election.

DesJarlais faces Democrat Mariah Phillips in the Nov. 6 election.

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7:30 p.m.

Incumbent Phil Roe has won the Republican primary in Tennessee's 1st Congressional District in the northeastern part of the state.

Roe, of Jonesborough, is seeking his sixth term in the U.S. House of Representatives. He significantly outpaced three other Republicans in campaign contributions and was considered the overwhelming favorite to win the primary.

Re-election committees for Congressmen Paul Ryan, Kevin McCarthy and Steve Scalise have given money to Roe's campaign.

Roe faces physician Marty Olsen, the lone Democrat in the primary.

Roe is one of six incumbents seeking a return to Washington to represent Tennessee in the House.

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7:25 p.m.

Incumbent Chuck Fleischmann is the winner of the Republican primary in Tennessee's 3rd Congressional District.

Fleischmann is seeking his fifth term in the House. District 3 winds its way from the Kentucky state line in northeast Tennessee to Chattanooga in the south.

Fleischmann, of Ooltewah, held a massive fundraising lead over the three Republicans who were trying to unseat him.

He faces Danielle Mitchell of Hixson in the general election on Nov. 6. Mitchell is a doctor from Hixson.

The general election is Nov. 6.

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6:15 p.m.

Tom Bergschicker, a 53-year-old insurance agent, voted for Randy Boyd in the Republican governor's race at a church in the Memphis suburb of Collierville.

He says he likes that Boyd he drew the endorsement of former GOP presidential candidate and ex-Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, and that Boyd is a businessman.

Bergschicker says, "He's a businessman. I'm a businessman. I think it takes a businessman to run things fiscally."

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3:45 p.m.

Linda Humber, a 68-year-old Republican and former city clerk in Alabama who moved to Nashville three years ago, cast her ballot for Marsha Blackburn as the Republican congresswoman pursues her party's nomination for the U.S. Senate race.

Humber, a Republican, says she voted for Blackburn because she likes her and because of party affiliation. Humber says of Blackburn: "I feel like I knew her. She's out there so much." Humber also had voted for Donald Trump for president in 2016 and says: "I would do it again."

Key nominations are at stake in Tennessee for open races for the U.S. Senate and governor as voters take part in state primary elections Thursday. The ballot also includes contests for the U.S. House and the Republican-led General Assembly.

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2:30 p.m.

Elaine and Cliff Seltzer are retired New Yorkers who moved to Nashville about a decade ago. They say they are angry about President Donald Trump and voted straight-Democrat ballots on Tennessee's primary day.

Both saw choosing Democrats as a way to help thwart Trump and change the country's direction.

Elain Seltzer says, "There was no question that I was going to vote today." She adds she voted Thursday for former Democratic Gov. Phil Bredesen in the U.S. Senate contest and Democrat Karl Dean in the race for governor.

Her husband Cliff says he still doesn't understand why so many people in the South have voted for Trump.

Key nominations are at stake in Tennessee for open races for governor and U.S. Senate as voters take part in state primary elections. The ballot also includes contests for the U.S. House and the Republican-led General Assembly.

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12:30 p.m.

Nashville voter Robert Crowell says he voted for U.S. Rep. Diane Black in Tennessee's governor's race because he had seen her on television talking about her platform.

He says he voted for candidates, like Black, who agree with President Donald Trump on issues like having a strong national defense and protecting America's borders.

Other GOP front-runners vying to succeed popular term-limited Republican Gov. Bill Haslam include state House Speaker Beth Harwell, former state economic development Commissioner Randy Boyd and businessman Bill Lee.

The two leading Democrats are former Nashville Mayor Karl Dean and state House Minority Leader Craig Fitzhugh.

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11:30 a.m.

Voter Diane Dimel said Thursday outside her Nashville polling place that she's a registered Republican and cast her ballot for state House Speaker Beth Harwell in the governor's race, but she probably won't vote that way in the general election.

Dimel said she decided against U.S. Rep. Diane Black after seeing her ads with President Donald Trump. Dimel said she voted for Trump in a tough decision but no longer supports him.

Looking to the general election, Dimel said she would likely change her party affiliation and vote for a Democratic governor.

Other GOP front-runners vying to succeed popular term-limited Republican Gov. Bill Haslam include former state economic development Commissioner Randy Boyd and businessman Bill Lee. The two leading Democrats are former Nashville Mayor Karl Dean and state House Minority Leader Craig Fitzhugh.

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11 a.m.

Gov. Bill Haslam is touting Republican U.S. Rep. Marsha Blackburn's candidacy for U.S. Senate, saying the race is about who voters want to control the Senate.

At a Blackburn campaign event in Brentwood, Haslam told a room of Republicans that their role is to remind people of "the Marsha you've known for a long time" and say that the "caricature" that will be drawn of her isn't really true.

He echoed Blackburn's comments that if the Democratic majority flips, Democrats start replacing Republicans as committee chairmen.

Her likely opponent, former Democratic Gov. Phil Bredesen, has contended he doesn't have a commitment to support Minority Leader Chuck Schumer for majority leader. He has pledged to be an independent voice in the Senate.

Both face only marginal opposition in Thursday's primary election.

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12:15 a.m.

Key nominations are at stake in Tennessee for open races for governor and U.S. Senate as voters take part in state primary elections.

The ballot includes contests for the U.S. House and the Republican-led General Assembly.

About 626,900 people have already voted early or absentee, a jump of more than 62,000 from the 2014 midterm election. More than six in every 10 early or absentee ballots cast this primary were Republican.

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